There are many illnesses that kelpies are prone to. Some of the most common include: hip dysplasia, epilepsy, elbow dysplasia, liver disease, cardiac disease, and blindness. In addition to these general health concerns, kelpies also commonly suffer from specific conditions related to their breeds and lifestyles. For example, Scottish fold kelpies are prone to eye diseases such as macular degeneration and cataracts. English cockney terriers are particularly prone to heart problems due to their heavy smoking and diet problem., Mallorcan sheepdogs suffer from urinary tract infections and intestinal parasites., Australian shepherds often develop bloat or gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV), a life-threatening stomach disorder in which a dog’s stomach swells so much that it twists on its longitudinal axis blocking eating and breathing..

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Bullmastiffs are prone to a few health problems, such as obesity, hypothyroidism, urinary tract issues and orthopedic disorders. They also commonly suffer from heart problems, bronchitis and cancer. In general, these dogs have a high rate of diseases relative to their size. This is likely due to their dedicated work as livestock guardians in warm climates.


Worth knowing

A lot of people believe that 50 grams of fiber a day is good for your digestive system. Fiber is a type of carbohydrate and it helps keep things moving through your GI tract. Without fiber, food can stay in your stomach longer, which can cause gas and bloating. Fiber also helps to regulate bowel movements and reduce the risk of obesity and heart disease. Some studies have even shown that people who eat more fiber are less likely to develop chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, compared to those who don’t eat enough fiber. So if you want to maintain good health, adding some fiber to your diet is a smart move!


Worth knowing

One of the most common problems with urinary tract infections (UTIs) is that their smell can be quite offensive. When urine accumulates in the bladder, it can become concentrated and cause an unpleasant odor. Here are some of the main things that can kill the smell of urine:

– cystitis: This is an inflammation of the urethra or urinary bladder. Increased levels of bacteria in the urine can cornu cernate and lead to cystitis. This can cause a bad odor as well as increased frequency and difficulty urinating. Treatment focuses on relieving symptoms, such as pain during urination and strong ammonia smells coming from the penis or vagina.
There is no cure for cystitis, but medications such as antibiotics, painkillers, and soaks can help relieve symptoms and make life easier for those living with this condition.
– Surgery: There are times when surgery is necessary to treat a UTI – for example if there is significant blockage in the urinary tract due to infection or stones blocking flow of urine. Sometimes certain procedures like hydronephrology (urine Detox) may also be necessary to clear up an infection before surgery takes place


Worth knowing

Every animal is different, so what works for one dog may not be the best diet for another. That being said, many people believe that a farmer’s dog food diet should consist of mostly raw meat and Bones. There are pros and cons to this type of diet but ultimately it comes down to personal preference and what works best for your pet.
One pro of a raw meat/bones diet is that it offers more variety and thus encourages your pet to eat their meals. Not only that, but some think that the lack of processing means that the nutrients in the food are more intact which can help boost digestion and overall health.
However, there are also some cons to a farmer’s dog food diet consisting predominantly of raw meat/bones including potential intestinal blockages from undigested material (in particular if your dog has class 3 hepatic problems), risk of disease transmission (from bacteria or parasites present on raw meats) and possible weight gain as a result of over-indulgence in high-quality protein sources. Ultimately, it’s up to you – or your veterinarian – to decide how healthy your pet would be on a raw meat/bones based diet with those risks considered.

Thank your for reading!

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